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How much sleep do my kids really need?

How much sleep do my kids really need?
At Dream Pillow, we always want to provide education and help parents along their journey. One of the most common questions that we get asked is how many hours of sleep do our children really need? Of course the answer varies by age, but the answer starts with knowing just how important a solid night of sleep for toddlers, kids, and teens really is.

Introducing the Idea of Visualization to your Kids

Introducing the Idea of Visualization to your Kids

While we love the idea of Dream Pillow providing kids (and parents) a restful night of sleep, but positive thinking and visualization isn’t just for nighttime. Teaching kids to visualize, or “make pictures in their mind” is a great way to introduce the idea of manifestation, and there are also great benefits in education such as reading comprehension and overall retention.

Banish the Bogeyman, and other Scary Monsters!

Banish the Bogeyman, and other Scary Monsters!
Did you know that the origins of the Bogeyman date all the way back to the 1800’s? Originating from the English word “bogge” meaning hobgoblin, almost every culture throughout the world has a tall tale of a scary monster that haunts small children. 

How to Use Your Dream Pillow

How to Use Your Dream Pillow
The Dream Pillow is a new bedtime accessory that helps kids dream good dreams. Here’s a quick guide on how to use your Dream Pillow and enjoy a peaceful night of sleep and good dreams!

Bedtime Snacks Causing Bad Dreams?

Bedtime Snacks Causing Bad Dreams?
According to Livestrong.com, several studies attempted to determine the relationship between eating before bed and dreams. Several of the studies indicated that eating and overeating before bed may increase brain wave activity, and that this heightened activity could increase the vividness of dreams, including nightmares.

Bye, Bye Bad Dreams

Bye, Bye Bad Dreams

It’s natural for children to experience bad dreams, and studies tell us that nightmares can begin as early as three years old. According to Cleveland Clinic, 10 to 50% of children experience nightmares, bad dreams that are significant enough to disturb their parents.